Join Our Mailing List!
Latest News:
South Park “Friends” Fall Book Sale Is Here -- "The Friends of South Park Township Library annual fall book sale is here, ..." -- 30 September 2017
Peters Creek Historical Society Plans Program on ... -- "The Peters Creek Historical Society welcomes Mr. Clay Kilgore as their guest ..." -- 30 September 2017
Monongahela Mother's Club Celebrates 115-Year ... -- "The Monongahela Mother's Club will hold their October meeting at Hoss's ..." -- 30 September 2017
South Park Theatre Closes Out Season with ... -- "By Christen M. Stroh South Park Theatre is closing out their main-stage ..." -- 30 September 2017
"Holly Days" Christmas Craft Show in Claysville ... -- "A "Holly Days" Christmas Craft Show will be held on Saturday, November 4 at the ..." -- 30 September 2017
Bethel Park Community Day and Car Cruise Bring ... -- "The Bethel Park Community Day, held on September 9, brought friends and ..." -- 30 September 2017
Saint Elizabeth Elementary School Hallo-Boo Cash ... -- "Saturday evening, October 28, in the Saint Elizabeth Parish gymnasium, a ..." -- 29 September 2017
Soup Cook-Off at the Pleasant Hills American ... -- "There will be a soup cook-off at the Pleasant Hills American Legion Post 712, ..." -- 29 September 2017
Smithton American Legion Post #790 Recognized as ... -- "Len Dulik, the Commander of the 31st District American Legion, Department of ..." -- 29 September 2017
South Hills Interfaith Movement Earns Charity ... -- "South Hills Interfaith Movement (SHIM) earned a four-star rating from Charity ..." -- 29 September 2017

Automotive

(BPT) - Today's teens face more distractions than any generation before.

Many don't recall a time when they were not continuously connected to their friends. Cell phones - which might have been provided as a safety precaution in case Mom or Dad was running late picking them up from school - are now the source of constant messaging, sharing and media consumption.

23115496 original
Drive Away Teen Driving Distractions

Teens send texts instead of passing notes in class. They share moments with their peers and the world in the form of photos and short videos. Music, food and transportation can arrive on demand, all with the swipe of a finger. Being away from their phones, even for a short period of time, can even cause a form of separation anxiety expressed in the acronym FOMO (fear of missing out).

So it should come as no surprise that cell phone use is the offense most commonly associated with distracted driving. However, it's not the only type of distraction.

"A lot of people think they're better drivers than they actually are, which is why they take unnecessary risks when they're behind the wheel," said Randy Petro, chief claims officer for Mercury Insurance. "We see a lot of claims related to distracted driving, including parents turning to scold arguing children, adjusting the infotainment system, and even taking photos while driving. Your first priority once you start piloting any vehicle should be to focus on the task at hand - driving."

Ten percent of all drivers ages 15 to 19 who were involved in fatal crashes were distracted at the time of the crashes, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). NHTSA also reports that 660,000 people drive distracted every day.

Teens aren't the only ones who feel the need to be connected - adults are guilty of it, too.

Many of the teens who are glued to their smartphones have witnessed their parents answering emails at the dinner table or have seen them shoot a "quick text" while driving. Teens have grown up learning that this type of behavior is acceptable and maybe even expected. However, there's a right time and a right place for everything.

"The first thing parents need to do is practice what they preach. Teenagers won't always be receptive to 'because I say so' or 'because I'm the adult,' especially if they witness their parents actively engaging in a behavior they're being told is bad," adds Petro. "We as adults need to set a proper example - after all, we do have the advantage of more life experience."

Parents should set a powerful example by committing not to drive distracted if they want their children to do the same. If necessary, parents can also invest in technology to monitor and disable phones while their teens are driving to eliminate the temptation altogether.

"No Instagram post, bite of a burger or playlist selection is worth someone else's life. People are mainly in a car to get from point A to point B, and our wish is for them to do it safely," says Petro.

There are several excellent online resources that provide tips and information to help prepare teens for life behind the wheel, including Mercury Insurance's Drive Safe Challenge and NHTSA's Distraction.gov.

RealEstate270x64


cooked goose web banner ad 

Bartons Bake shop banner

PaVendors-web-ad

Trinity 275

Slagle 275

Mon Valley Hospital

  • Prev
  • Featured Advertisers
Scroll to top